Scotland (3/3)

The word hospitality in Greek is composed by the words “Philao” (brotherly love) and “Xenos” (stranger, immigrant and even enemy). In Latin, hospitality shares the same root with hospital meaning “guest chamber”; a shelter for the needy. In both instances, acts of service and assistance are involved; anticipating and taking care of someone’s needs. It is hard work that requires thinking, planning, preparing and paying the cost. Once in a while it might be inconvenient and invariably it’s time consuming.

My hosts, Christoph and Christine Ewers, are originally from Germany, but have made Scotland their home. They own and run The Ardshealach smokehouse. Their family business brought memories when my parents had a small bakery shop in Mexico. I learned many things about baking and management, but above all, to pray for customers. We work diligently according to God-given skills and then we depend on Him to bring people to buy our products. Their small enterprise is in my prayers. Anyone traveling in the area should stop by this private, small factory to get excellent customer service by the very same owners.

The Ewers ministered to my heart in a great impacting way. They opened their home to me, sharing what they have: time, food, friendship, acceptance, comfort. They arranged with other people (Lighthouse Church), as nice, loving and kind as they are, to attend me and give me each day a different sightseeing tour of the extraordinary Highlands.

To say “Scottish people are friendly” is an understatement for much more could be said. There must be exceptions; I understand that, but my experience was all positive. Chilly weather in the summer, rain almost every day, however warmth brotherhood every single moment.

Sometimes you hear a good sermon preached from the pulpit in church; some other unique and exceptional times you see a sermon lived. These people preached powerfully to me with their hospitality. Thank you.

 

Scotland (1/3)

Where and how do I start to describe, try to portray and put into words what I experienced and my eyes have seen in my two weeks in a “wee” part in the west coast of the Highlands of Scotland?

English is not my first language, so I thought it was going to be a frustration, but I was wrong. Even though I did have my moments of confusion; it was the ever present indication of being in a foreign country. I think their way of speaking is lovely!

“A mind that is stretched by a new experience can never go back

to its old dimensions”  O.W. Holmes

Photography is just my hobby. I am not any close to any expert knowledge about  cameras, lenses, modes, etc. I take pictures because I like to take pictures, of everything for that matter. But if I were a professional photographer; I would say that Scotland is any photographer’s paradise. Almost every corner has the perfect spot for photographing. I now have a personal collection of snapshots from every path my feet trod, from each step in the beach, from every hill walking.

“Which of my photographs is my favorite?

Hopefully, the one I’m going to take tomorrowImogen Cunningham

Arisaig, Morar, Mallaig, Fort William, Glenfinnan, I fell in love with you; picturesque villages. Your greatness is not in your size, but in your friendly people, in your extensive fascinating landscape, in your countless blue lochs, in your castle-style houses and churches, in the homey atmosphere of your diners and in your historical train rails and stations. Your countless drops of rain not just got me wet, they saturated me with memories…unforgettable moments.

“It’s good people who make good places” A. Sewell

I can still feel the jet lag effects of this trip in my body. It will be vanishing and finally gone away; but for the time being, it doesn’t bother me, I am “savoring”, taking pleasure in it. I can say it is a good discomfort that reminds me I traveled. Any cost paid for traveling is nothing compared to the huge difference between looking at picture of a place and saying “I was there”.

“Better to see something once than hear about it a thousand times”

 

 

 

 

 

Published in: on July 25, 2019 at 5:05 am  Comments (2)  
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Celebrating Anniversaries

This year I got to celebrate two anniversaries of two very special and respected academic institutions:

75-ebcEmmaus Bible College started in 1941 in Toronto, Canada under the leadership of three men: R.E. Harlow, John Smart and C. Earnest Tatham. In 1947 growing enrollment lead to the establishment of a campus in Chicago and 1953 the school acquired the YMCA building. In 1984 moved to a 17-acre campus in Dubuque, Iowa and received accreditation to grant bachelor degrees. Today is a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

 

60-eccEscuela Cristiana Camireña was founded in 1956 in Camiri, Bolivia by educators and missionaries Eugene and Loraine Train. Some of the same old adobe-brick classrooms are still there, but by God’s providence there is also a new building with air-conditioned classrooms.

It has been a wonderful experience for me to be in the celebrations of the many years of service and to hear old and new stories of many people through the decades whose lives’ purpose, direction and meaning have been given, marked and taught by the teaching, influence and counsel of Godly men and women.

The topic of GOD’S FAITHFULNESS has been repeatedly brought up in the two celebrations. Dr Daniel Smith pointed out three ingredients of faithfulness:

1.- Character: There has to be integrity, honesty and rectitude.

2.- Commitment: Able to keep his word, a promise, a guarantee.

3.- Capability: The ability, the power to carry out.

In conclusion, God’s faithfulness is something:

He DOES and He IS.

Published in: on November 10, 2016 at 5:13 am  Leave a Comment  
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Glass Beach

images“In the early 1900s, Fort Bragg, California, image039
residents threw their household garbage
over the cliffs above what is now Glass Beach.
It is hard to imagine this happening today,
But back then people dumped all kinds
of refuse straight into the ocean,
including old cars, and their household garbage,
which of course included lots of glass.

Beginning in 1949, the area around Glass Beach became a public dump, and locals referred to it as The Dumps.
Sometimes fires were lit to reduce the size of the trash pile (up to 30 feet high). However in 1967, the city leaders closed the area. Various cleanup programs were undertaken through the years to try to correct the damage, but without success.

Over the next 30 years the pounding waves cleaned the beach, by breaking down everything but glass and pottery. The pounding waves washed the trash up and down, back and forth. Tons of polished, broken glass were created by the pounding surf. These smoothed, coloured glass particles then settled along the sea shore in millions, and so a magnificent beach was formed.
The name was changed from, The Dump to what we currently know as, The Glass Beach. The sea glass that was created is the product of a very long and interesting process. It can take anywhere from 10 to 30 years to make sea glass, the name for any piece of glass that finds its way to the ocean and tumbles around in the water long enough to frost and smooth its surface.
Once it makes its way into the ocean, the glass is broken up into shards and is tumbled around in the water, where sand and other rocks act like sandpaper to smooth out its rough edges.
In 1998, the private owner of the property determined that Glass Beach should belong to the public and in 2002 it became part of MacKerricher State Park, open to the public. Within a period of a few years the Glass Beach won fame, attracting a large number of tourists every year.
Way back in time, people wanted to dump their glass products on this shore; now they would try to get one of these pieces to take home as a souvenir. It is ironic but true that where once it was illegal to dispose the glass on the shore, it now is a crime to remove it. Visiting the Glass Beach today is a unique experience. What makes it even more remarkable, are the sounds produced by the glass pebbles as they are being washed away by the gentle waves. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia).

glass beach
It’s hard to believe the short-sighted mistakes we were making that could have potentially ruined this beautiful spot. But thanks to natural processes, the ocean transformed the trash into the sea glass.

 I read this article about GLASS BEACH and realized that the spiritual beauty that I would like to see in myself TAKES TIME (Phil. 1:6) but I am very encouraged to know God can accomplish it.

God wants our lives to be beautiful, because God is glorified by beautiful things. But this beauty is not something that comes automatically; it is the result of the difficult process of living.”God has made everything beautiful in his time.” Let us wait on the Lord and let Him work out His plan; one day we will see the beauty of it all.

Published in: on July 24, 2014 at 6:11 am  Comments (1)  
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